Vintage Heriz Handwoven Tribal Rug, J68405

$5,500.00

Availability:

Size: 7' 8" X 11' 4"

SKU: J68405

Pile Fiber: Wool

Surface: Pile

Age: Vintage

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PRODUCT INFORMATION

SKU J68405
Size 7' 8" X 11' 4"
Size Category 8 X 10
Shape Rectangle
Design Heriz
Origin Persian
Style Tribal
Sub Style Nomadic Persian & Turkish
Primary Color Pink
Background Color Dusty Rose
Accent Color Navy
Pile Fiber Wool
Foundation Fiber Cotton
Construction Handwoven
Surface Pile
Age Vintage
Circa 1925

This vintage Persian rug is drawn from the Heriz design tribe, dating back to circa 1925. Its size is approximately 7'8" X 11'4" with a comprehensive blend of wool on cotton. An observance of the rug reveals a dusty rose background with a strong visual emphasis on the color red.

A predominant feature of this rug is its explicitly symmetrical design, rendering a strong inclination towards meticulous craftsmanship and a profound respect for the intricacy of design details. A large, ornate medallion serves as the focal point of the rug's design. The geometric and floral compositions within the medallion feature a spectrum of colors such as blue, pink, beige, and brown, all contributing to a richly saturated and complex design.

The secondary elements surrounding the medallion comprise smaller, yet equally intricate designs. The blend of smaller medallions and interlocking patterns harmoniously populate the field around the central medallion, adding sophistication to the design dynamics of the rug.

The choice of colors successfully manages to find a balance between warm and cooler tones. The contrast between various shades is significantly responsible for heightening the elaborateness of the patterns throughout the rug.

Surrounding the filled central area of the rug lies a broad primary border marked by a repeating pattern. This pattern exhibits strong impressions of floral motifs and geometric shapes. This primary border is further encased within narrower secondary borders, providing their unique repeating designs to the collective aesthetics of the rug.

Considering the complexity of the design and the quality of execution, it can be surmised that the rug was likely hand-woven, a mark of high quality in the field of textile craftsmanship. Furthermore, the degree of design intricacy and attention to details resonate well with traditional motifs typically associated with Oriental or Persian origins, both regions being recognized for their rich heritage in carpet weaving.

Heriz design carpets, named after the Heris village in Northwestern Iran, are appreciated worldwide for their potent sense of design and exemplary durability. These rugs are distinctly marked by their robust geometric designs, bold medallions, and brightly saturated colors. The durability of these rugs is mainly attributed to the superior quality of wool utilized in their composition.

On a historical note, the roots of the "diamond on a square" Heriz signature design can be traced back to the late 19th century, evolving over time through the influence of antique carpet designs. Consequently, the Heriz rug bridges the divide between rural and courtly textile cultures, creating a distinctive blend of rustic craftsmanship and opulent Persian court pieces.

Interestingly, the cold climate of the Heriz region is conducive to the production of fine wool, making rug weaving an apt winter occupation.

The Heriz rug is thus an embodiment of cultural dialogue and exchange over the centuries. Beyond the aesthetic attributes, these rugs narrate stories of cultural assimilation with characteristics influenced by neighboring tribes, such as the Turks, Armenians, and Kurds. This makes each Heriz rug an exclusive piece distinguished by the unique and bold angular designs.

The construction of a Heriz rug is noteworthy for its dense piles, contributing to the durability and longevity of the rug. The color palette of Heriz rugs is typically limited yet neutral, making these rugs highly compatible with various home interior settings, particularly those with prominent woodwork.

Despite the global popularity of Heriz rugs, the traditional techniques involved in their production have endured over time, retaining their authenticity and cultural relevance.

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